Spoiler Warning


Always assume Spoilers and possible profanity in context. These are often adult themed movies.


Sunday, December 29, 2013

Mob City

I like Frank Darabont, perhaps not as much as some do, (The Shawshank Redemption is great, but it's no Cool Hand Luke) but he's a talented guy that always makes a good looking, professional product. (And I love his ending for "The Mist") It's a shame that his latest venture "Mob City" is colored as him having something to prove after the fall out from "The Walking Dead." How anyone could compare the two shows is beyond me, as they couldn't be more different. If anything, that huge difference is only a tribute to his range.

It's news to no one, that zombies are popular right now and Darabont brought the Walking Dead to life at a perfect time to tap TV watchers' fascination. Since then the vision has changed hands many times, and from all appearances it'll just keep going until there's a spin off for every living character. It's all in the premise, it's set to go on and on until everyone is sick of it, and then probably another couple years. Darabont may well count himself lucky one day, that he got to exit before we've all had way too much of it. As far as I'm concerned, if Darabont had something to prove, he did it very well both times, bringing the Walking Dead to life, and now with Mob City.

"Mob City" is a closed story, caught at a very specific point in the past, 1940's L.A., in the days of Bugsy Siegel and Mickey Cohen, a hopelessly corrupt police force and Chief William Parker's attempts to clean things up. Once Siegel, Cohen and Parker are gone, so is the story. I think this kind of story can bring out the best in a director and it does here, giving a framework, and certain character sketches, but also enough room for invention within. The invented characters like Joe Teague and Sid Rothman give an easy access point to the story. While they may not be exactly true to facts, they're certainly based on guys who would have been around. The fact that they haven't been written about however, gives them the freedom to do anything including complicate their lives, as long as they don't alter the facts we know.

And, there are plenty of stories inside that time frame. Darabont chooses the viewpoint of bit player, Detective Joe Teague (Jon Bernthal) a guy involved in the battle between Chief Parker (Neal McDonogh) and Bugsy Siegel (Edward Burns) only because Siegel is the Department's main business. Teague is mostly a good cop who came back from the war as damaged goods. He served with Bugsy's current fixer Ned Stax (Milo Ventimiglia) who he still talks to now and then, which turns out to be both a good and bad thing, when he agrees to take a side job as intimidation for a lousy comedian who has an idea to make some money from Bugsy. If you've ever seen a noir story in your life, you'll know that this simple idea goes off the rails pretty quick, which leaves us with the interesting parts, the "how," "why," and "then what?"

We've seen most of these characters before, but not exactly like this. They're based on stock cop/ gangster characters but they take on their own dimensions. Teague, by strict definition could be seen as a dirty cop, and we're shown that being a dirty cop at this point in time is the norm. But in "Mob City" the reasons matter. Teague is a dirty cop that will do Siegel a favor if it serves his own interest, but he won't pretend he did it for Siegel. He won't take a pay off for doing so, regardless of the consequence. Bernthal gets the character just right, and his Teague is a worthy addition to the L.A. lore. He gets the stoic loner who doesn't play well with others down perfectly, a wild card, but more competent and informed than you might think.

Period gangster pieces always struggle to find a huge audience. Consider the fact that L.A. Confidential, the contemporary masterpiece of L.A. period gangster films didn't even make back twice its budget. 1991's "Bugsy" ended up in the same boat. "Gangster Squad," the most recent all star attempt still hasn't made its budget back. There's a devoted audience for these stories, but they're clearly not for everyone. Perhaps that's as it should be, the important thing is that they succeed in satisfying the audience they're made for, and Darabont does that incredibly well, giving us an authentic looking update of the noir story, which, in 1940's L.A. is a shadow cast from a bright orange shape. This is Hollywood Noir, make no mistake, and it looks fantastic to showcase the rot underneath. Inspired by John Buntin's "L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America's Most Seductive City" it informs itself with the facts as a framework and then asks if we really know the whole story.

Simon Pegg not a TV regular, does a surprising turn here as Hecky Nash, a desperate comic who gets events rolling by making a bad choice. As loathsome as Nash is, Pegg makes him distinctive, and we don't wonder why Bugsy Siegel stopped hanging around with him when they grew up. I was surprised at how good Edward Burns was as Bugsy Siegel, as it's not a role I would ever expect from him. The unexpectedness makes him stand out, but in a way that only helps the character, he comes across as a complete wild card too, too hotheaded to know or care that he's in trouble.

Milo Ventmiglia's Ned Stax helps us ease into this world as the welcoming face of the organization, always calm and collected, but he can't help it if you don't listen to him. He reinforces the focus on the smaller players as being pivotal to events. His ties with Joe Teague, and his understanding of Teague's motives place him in a precarious position. It's obvious there is a real loyalty and friendship between the two, but much like Bugsy, Teague is not into advice, giving Stax the real rock and a hard place predicament.

Robert Knepper plays Sid Rothman, Cohen's muscle and the most direct foil to Joe Teague. He's very clearly a sociopath that loves the whole cops and robbers game. Rather than mindless thug, he always makes the smart play. He'll kill you without hesitation, but not if it doesn't serve his interests. If it makes more sense, he'll just kill you later. Alexa Davalos plays Jasmine Fontaine, the complicated and mysterious love interest that can't help but cause trouble for everyone concerned. Neal McDonough is somewhat underused, but he portrays the cop that won't be corrupted quite well, with as many enemies in the department as he has among the gangsters. I only hope they make more of these as Parker's future seemed to be shaping up in interesting ways. An of course, Jeremy Luke's Mickey Cohen was also great, not as flashy as Bugsy, but not afraid to get his hands dirty either, like Parker another character who is well set up for the future.

With six hours to tell the story "Mob City" managed to keep me interested the whole time, making it feel more like an event than a series. While some may have trouble with the initial pacing, I enjoyed having the time to take in all the details of this Los Angeles, it's police force and underworld. It was also interesting to note the beginnings of many events that would only pay off much later, like Siegel's quest to make Las Vegas the biggest thing around while his bosses' enthusiasm waned when the money went more out than in. Knowing what happened doesn't make the story any less compelling, instead it fills in some blanks, and enjoys working with some mysteries of the time.

Mob City stretches the limits of what's possible on TV, and having six episodes in three weeks made it feel as close to cinematic as possible. I'm hoping they come up with more, but whether they do or not, it's encouraging that a project like this could come out in the first place. This is a top notch cast, with amazing attention to period detail, from the sets and clothes to the speech patterns. The quality of the production is astounding for television. It may not make everyone happy, but it's a triumph nonetheless. Anyone who loves noir stories as much as Darabont apparently does, will have a lot to be happy about.

6 comments:

Zoey Francis said...

I really enjoyed your take on this, Brent. In a way, I almost felt like you were writing to me, since we had discussed the series a little. ;)

I think you made great points about how this show was above and beyond what's normally created for television. But you definitely enjoyed it more than I did. Initially, I had issues with the writing and other behind-the-scenes choices. As the episodes progressed though, it felt more compelling. The finale was simply outstanding and unpredictable.

Thanks for a very entertaining read (and terrific research, too). Here's hoping that TNT decides to bring back a quality project with endless potential!

Brent Allard said...

Thanks for checking it out, Zoey! Glad it all came together for you by the end. Personally I enjoyed the build up, getting a chance to know all the players before things went off the rails. The ending though, yeah that was something else. I did make a note to show this to you especially, as I do recall all the discussions we've had about it.

J.D. Lafrance said...

Excellent article!

Y'know, I really wanted to like this show with all the talent involved, but sadly, to me, it feels like warmed-up leftovers from LA CONFIDENTIAL and CRIME STORY, respectively. I dunno if it's the source material or Darabont's take on it, but it just feels so "been there, done that." Which is too bad, because the show looks great and I love Jon Bernathal who, with his bruised features, looks like he stepped out of an early '50s noir, and is the best thing about the show. Too bad, Ed Burns is horribly miscast. Awful. I read that the ratings were very low for it so I don't know if it's going to survive beyond this initial run. I guess we'll see.

Brent Allard said...

Thanks, J.D! I can relate to what you're saying. It really is a variation in stories we've seen but u enjoyed this take quite a bit. I didn't really warm up to burns until halfway through but I think he pulled it off in the end. I'd still rather see white jazz happen but for now mob city was a nice tribute to the genre. I also heard the ratings were not great though I hope they get another shot.

Melissa Bradley said...

Loved reading your take on this, but I find Walking Dead to be far superior in every way. I did not warm to any of the characters but Rothman, Teague and Shecky as I'm not a particular fan of anyone but Pegg and Bernthal. Davalos bored me to tears as she always does and Neal McDonough always grates on my last nerve. His characters are always way too intense and completely black or white as he never manages to grasp shades of grey.

I also prefer Chicago, New York and Las Vegas for my mob stories. LA just seems blah and overdone to me. I can't stand Bugsy Siegal as he was just a flashy baby and Mickey Cohen was a just a freak. I don't find either one of them worth reading about. Scarface, Meyer Lanski, Sam Giancana...now those were mobsters. I guess I just never got into the whole LA scene. I watched Mulholland Drive, LA Confidential and they bored me. In fact, LAC made my worst all time film list.

I know, you're probably looking at me like I've lost my mind, but there you go. Frank Darabont is a great writer and I'd love to see more from him, just not more LA mob stories.

Brent Allard said...

Hi Mel,

I'm still following the Walking Dead, which has it's flaws but remains very watchable. Still, it does seem there are spinoff plans and I suspect the whole brand will be stretched very thin at some point. I'll give it a chance though. I just think looking at Mob City as an attempt by Darabont to "reprove" himself, doesn't make much sense as the two efforts have little in common other than Darabont. I don't think for a second that Darabont anticipated beating Walking Dead ratings. He's been around awhile and surely knows that the only reason to make an LA Mob Story is because you're fascinated with doing it and have a story you want to cover. That being said, there are enough mob stories and locations out there to please anybody. I thought this one was remarkably well done. LA Confidential as a worst of all time, though? I can't even imagine that, but certainly respect your take on it.